Tag Archives: home design

Leafy Looks for Year-Round Enjoyment

Leaf-peeping is not just an autumnal activity, but a year-round pleasure in rooms where designers use foliage as a focal point or an eye-popping accent.

Designer Mitchell Hill says leaf motifs, like all florals, brighten rooms. In a kitchen, he used Schumacher’s Chiang Mai Dragon print, a leaf and floral pattern in an Art Deco-inspired chinoiserie motif, on the backs of island stools and for the curtains. By keeping the palette consistent throughout the room, he says, vibrant fabrics on chairs, curtains, and headboards offer color and texture, just like leaves do in their natural state. 

An abundance of leaf-inspired textiles with abstract patterns and unexpected palettes can help you layer the look in a room, even if the rest of the space isn’t outdoorsy. The patterns are painterly and loose, interpreted through the eyes of the textile artist, says designer Tami Ramsay of Cloth & Kind, a firm run by Ramsay and designer Krista Nye Nicholas.1508166836128

Cloth & Kind recovered a Palecek chair with the Hutan print by Caroline Cecil Textiles. Hutan, meaning “jungle” in Indonesian, brings foliage into the home with a hand-printed design on linen custom created using Pantone’s soft color palette. 

“It feels organic, and honestly, it’s also playful when you make a leaf pattern coral as opposed to green,” Ramsay says. “You’re not just seeing things that are a leaf in its normal state but kind of exploited and extracted out, not only in its color, but also in its shape.”1508166837192

Fall has swept leaves off the trees and onto a Donghia chair that Cloth & Kind upholstered in Menna fabric by Katie Leede & Co. The pattern is inspired by fan-shaped papyrus leaves falling in happy abundance, as Leede describes on her website.

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L’aviva Home’s Khovar collection, with patterns called vine, leaf and flower, presents foliage that appears as a hand-painted mural on fabric. Women in villages in northeastern India were commissioned for paintings that resulted in the patterns.

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Parker Kennedy Living’s preppy style took a tropical twist when it upholstered a CR Laine headboard with a banana leaf print for a Southeastern Designer Showhouse bedroom. Designers Lance Jackson and David Ecton showcased Dorothy Draper’s Brazilliance fabric in green and white with bamboo-pattern canopy drapes to channel Palm Beach chic in the Atlanta guest bedroom. 

You can use leaf prints in a variety of ways, from upholstery and draperies to framing fabrics and using remnants for cocktail napkins. A pillow, for example, is another simple leafy start.1508241284400

Claire Stevens Interior Design used the Banana Leaf print by Krane Home in sapphire on a lumbar pillow. 

“Just like it feels fabulous to have fresh flowers or even an arrangement with fresh greenery in it … adding those types of textural patterns bring a bit of that into the room all the time,” Ramsay says.
Post courtesy of HGTV.com
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10 Easy Decorating Ideas for Fall

Ready to give your home a mini makeover for fall? Here are 10 autumn-inspired home decorating ideas we love.

1. Faux-liage

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Add an autumnal touch to an open bookcase with silk fall leaves, which you can find at your local craft store. Whether they’re pressed inside a picture frame or strategically placed along the shelves, autumn-colored leaves are sure to pump up the fall factor. Design by Layla Palmer

2. Paper Pretties

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Fall decorating doesn’t have to be expensive, especially if your material of choice is paper. Book pages, framed silhouettes, and a colorful pennant banner make an inexpensive impact in this living room. Design by Krista Janos

3. Less Is More

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Create a fresh, fall look with an orange-and-white palette. Here, white furniture and accessories, paired with a few orange accents create a sophisticated balance. Design by Melissa Smith

4. Pedestals and Pennants

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Pumpkins on pedestals and pennant banners made from fall-themed scrapbook paper or fabric will give an open hutch a healthy hint of autumn. Design by Sara Madrigal-Fehling

5. White Pumpkins

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Keep it simple with an elegant display of white, or ghost, pumpkins. For visual interest, stagger the heights by using stacks of old books or vintage scales as pedestals. Design by Beth Hunter

6. Painted Pumpkins

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Faux pumpkins and gourds painted in a monochromatic color scheme add understated elegance to this mantel. Design by Susie Harris

7. Birds of a Feather

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Pinecones, gourds, pheasant feathers and artificial owls add an organic, woodsy touch to this rustic, fall vignette. Design by Laura Putnam

8. Mason Jar Sconces

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Create quick-and-easy wall sconces this fall with a pair a vintage jars and some twine. Suspended from cup hooks in the ceiling and filled with cinnamon sticks and LED candles, these temporary sconces add warmth. Design by Holly Charlesworth

9. Natural Elements

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Weathered wood, antlers, rope and time-worn finishes make for a beautifully rustic, fall mantel display. Design by Catherine Beaver-Hawman

10. Spooky Stuff

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Inexpensive cheese cloth, skulls, a black wreath and decorative moss create one spook-tacular display. Design by Ashlie
Post and photos courtesy of HGTV.com

6 Apartment Upgrades That Landlords Hate (Bye-Bye, Security Deposit)

When you move into a place, it’s normal to want to make it your own, by hanging pictures or even painting an accent wall cherry red. But when you’re renting, you’d best remember: Any changes you make may be reversed by your landlord once you move out and with your money. That’s why renters have to walk a fine line between making themselves feel at home and making changes that will cost them their security deposit.

“If you decide to paint the walls while you are there, you must return them to their original color or the landlord is within their rights to use the deposit to pay for it themselves,” says Trent Zachmann of Renters Warehouse. He explains that many landlords treat modifications or improvements and accidental damages the same when it comes to taking money from your security deposit. “An owner can withhold all or part of the deposit to correct either type of issue,” he says.

But all is not lost: Sometimes modifications can be made with the owner’s approval. Just make sure you’re 100% clear about the stipulations of your lease before you pick up a paintbrush or hammer. Straight from the mouths of landlords, here’s a list of upgrades tenants have attempted that they hate—and will use your security deposit to fix.

1. Painting

This is the No. 1 alteration that landlords complain about.

Annmarie Bhola, a landlord in New York City, understands that for first-time renters especially, there’s an excitement with moving into a new home. And, to many, that means breaking out the paint.

“To feel at home, a fresh coat of personality-defining color is the icing on the cake,” she says. “That’s all cool, but know that if you paint the walls hot pink, it will be coming out of the security deposit! That was one of the most memorable colors I’ve had to repaint.”

Atlanta landlord Bruce Ailion describes creative painting projects as his biggest headache.

“You would think a tenant would pick a neutral color and have a professional paint,” he laments. “Instead they paint purple or black, get paint on the ceiling, on the trim, on the door knobs and outlets. Some will paint around the bed and pictures. It’s a mess.”

2. Hanging pictures

After repainting, filling in holes in drywall is one of the most common issues landlords have to deal with after a tenant moves out.

“Everyone likes to put up pictures, and fortunately new technologies have brought about alternative, less destructive hanging methods, which is great,” says Bhola. So then why don’t more people think to use Command strips instead of nails? “Nine out of 10 times, I always have to fill in the holes and bust out the spare bucket of paint.”

3. Installing window treatments

We know: Those white plastic vertical blinds are so ugly. Your impulse to put up a curtain rod or Roman shades is completely normal. But the holes you have to drill into the wall to mount the window treatments, like those for your pictures, will require patching once you move out. Landlords fume every time they see big screw marks around the window frame.

“Repairing the holes ends up being expensive and time-consuming,” says Zachmann. If you must hang curtains, use large Command hooks that adhere to the wall and don’t leave any stickiness behind.

4. Mounting a TV

What’s worse than hammering nails into the drywall to hang pictures or curtains? Drilling holes in the wall to mount your flat-screen TV.

“The screws have to go directly into the center of studs,” says Brian Davis, director of education at real estate service company SparkRental. “At best, the renter will have screwed 10 to 20 holes into the wall. At worst, the TV will crash to the floor [because it wasn’t mounted correctly], possibly injure someone, shatter the TV, and take a chunk of the wall down with it.” He recommends that renters use a TV stand.

5. Gardening

You would think that planting a few tulips would delight a landlord. But that’s not necessarily the case.

“As a landlord, I want the most maintenance-free rental as possible,” says Atlanta-area property owner and real estate writer Laura Agadoni. “In some cases, I pay for a landscaping service, but I would not want to keep up a garden.”

So, don’t make any changes to the landscaping without the landlord’s written permission. And if you do, don’t be surprised if your security deposit is used to return the yard to its previous state.

6. Updating appliances

If you’re not a fan of that noisy old refrigerator in your rental, it’s perfectly fine to swap it out with a new one of your own so long as you talk it over with your landlord first, and then reconnect the old one after you move out.

“What’s never acceptable is swapping out an appliance, throwing the old one away, and then taking the new one with you when you move out, leaving a gaping hole where there was once an appliance,” says Davis.

So if there’s something you’d like to update, just ask your landlord about it first. You never know.

“What some landlords will allow may be different than what other landlords allow,” says New York City broker Eric D. Rosen. “In some cases, it might even be possible that a landlord will share the cost.”

Article originally found on realtor.com

Fool-Proof Paint Colors That Will Sell Your Home

Selling a home with an electric, lime green living room in 2017 is going to be more difficult than you originally anticipated. In fact, your home might sit stagnant on the market for quite some time. The reality is that paint color packs a serious punch in the real estate game.

So, which colors are going to sell your home?

Armed with results from Zillow’s 2017 Paint Color Analysis, we’re dishing on the hues to use and the hues to lose before putting your house on the market. (Hint: Lime green didn’t make the list.)

The Front Door: Navy

Jacob Snavely

For a killer curb appeal and a lasting first impression, coat your front door in a neat, navy blue! This versatile, timeless shade looks beautiful with any exterior color. Bonus? Zillow reports that navy doors sold for $1,500+ more than any other hues on the market.

The Kitchen: Gray-Blue

Michael Hunter Photography

Zillow reports that homes with kitchens outfitted in soft, blue or gray hues often sold for a $1809.00 premium.

The Living Room: Warm Browns

Jenny Norris

Traditional beige, oatmeal and soft taupe reign supreme in living spaces for 2017. Zillow reports homes with warm brown living room walls sold for $1,900+ more than expected.

The Bedroom: Cerulean

Photographer: Christina Wedge

The report reveals that lively blues, such as cerulean or cadet blue, grants homes with a $1,856 premium.

The Bathroom: Pale Blue

Stacey Brandford

Fresh, clean and soothing – pale blue is the best-selling hue for the washroom. Not convinced in the power of paint yet? Zillow reports that light blue bathrooms sold for $5,000+ more (!!) than expected.

The Dining Room: Slate

Chipper Hatter

A sophisticated slate-blue hue for dining room walls will sell homes for more money. Zillow reports that slate dining rooms sold for nearly $2,000 more than plain, white dining rooms.

The Exterior: Greige

Light gray and warm beige marry to create the modern-day classic: greige. Zillow reports that greige-colored homes are outselling their brown or tan counterparts by $3,496.

Courtesy of zillow.com