Tag Archives: buy

Homeownership 101: Are You Ready?

Owning your own home is part of the American dream. But it takes more than just dreaming of buying and maintaining a home. Before you take the plunge, here are some things to ask yourself.

Does it make sense to buy?

Buying instead of renting needs to make sense financially. To help you decide, play with Zillow’s Buy vs. Rent calculator to see how many years it will take before the cost of buying equals the cost of renting. It’s called the breakeven horizon, and it varies by area of the country.

If you plan to stay in your home past your breakeven horizon, then buying makes financial sense. If you think you’ll move earlier, then renting may be the way to go.

Are you financially ready?

Buying a house involves raising a down payment and paying a monthly mortgage, which lasts anywhere from 5 to 30 years, depending on the home loan you can afford and are offered. There are other costs as well, but let’s focus on the big money.

Down payment: It’s the lump sum you’ll pay upfront that funds equity in the property and proves to lenders that you’ve got skin in this homeowner game. Down payments vary. In the go-go days that led up to the housing collapse, some lenders dismissed the down payment altogether – and we see how well that ended. Today, 20 percent is preferred and often gets you the best rates, but some loans allow down payments as low as 3 percent. Sometimes parents or friends can offer help with the down payment. If you have a choice, take a gift rather than a loan, not only for obvious reasons, but because lenders will add that debt to other monthly obligations and potential mortgage payments to determine your debt-to-income ratio, which generally can’t top 43 percent to qualify for a home loan.

Monthly mortgage payments: This is what you’ll pay each month. In most cases, a mortgage includes the loan principal and interest (both amortized over the life of the loan) plus homeowners insurance and property taxes (pro-rated). When credit was tight, getting a mortgage at any rate was reserved for only the most credit-worthy borrowers. Things have loosened, but lenders still want to know that you’re a responsible, gainfully employed and credit-worthy candidate.

Are you emotionally ready?

Owning a home is a huge commitment so before jumping in, consider if you are ready to make lots of decisions, from picking an agent to picking paint colors. Are you confident enough to select a neighborhood where you’ll want to stay for a while? And are you up for devoting the time and attention to maintaining a home? Weekends will disappear under chores like pulling weeds, cleaning gutters, shoveling snow, sealing counters and decks, and on and on. Taking care of your biggest investment can be gratifying but only if you’re ready.

Do you have the skills?

Your home will require regular maintenance and repair, and there’s no landlord to call for help. You’ll need some basic handyperson skills so you won’t go broke hiring a repair professional to remedy every odd sound or smell. Here are some things every homeowner should learn how to do:
• Change a toilet flapper
• Shut off the main water valve and outdoor faucets
• Change a furnace filter
• Clean gutters of debris
• Change smoke detector batteries
• Locate and flip breaker switches
• Locate studs to hang shelves
• Paint a room

Post courtesy of zillow.com

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How Much House Can You Really Afford?

Just because a lender approves you for a mortgage doesn’t mean you can comfortably afford it.

If you ask Google “how much house can I afford,” you’ll find a number of online tools and mortgage calculators to help you find a fast answer. You might also find quick but somewhat confusing advice like “your mortgage payment shouldn’t take up more than 35% of your monthly income.”

Quick. Do you know what 35% of your monthly income is? If not, you’re not alone. While online housing tools are a helpful starting point for the early stages of your house hunt, it’s important that you understand how the pieces all fit together, and that you take your personal financial situation into account.

Why a calculator can’t tell you how much house you can afford

  1. 1. Financial rules of thumb may not apply to you

    While 35% seems like a straightforward figure, your financial picture is a lot more complicated than that number would make things seem. Your ideal monthly housing costs could vary depending on things such as debt and other monthly payment obligations — not to mention how much you’ve saved for a down payment.

    If you have high credit scores and a clean financial background, a mortgage calculator can be a great starting point for mortgage shopping. You’ll get a much better sense of what your price range might be instead of a blanket rule of thumb. But they’re only as accurate as the information you provide, so if you forget to add regular budget line items such as food, day care, or gas costs, you won’t get a complete picture.

  2. 2. Your lender may approve you for more than you can realistically afford

    Lenders are now legally required to ensure borrowers can “reasonably afford” to repay a loan before they approve a new mortgage. But there’s a difference between being able to reasonably afford something and being able to realistically afford something.

    When looking at what’s reasonable, lenders account for your income and any current debts that you need to repay each month. If you make $5,000 per month after taxes and need to pay $500 toward your car loan each month, a mortgage payment of $1,500 may seem perfectly reasonable.

    In this (extremely simplified) example, you’d have about $3,000 per month left over to handle all your other expenses. And perhaps you can afford your living expenses on this budget.

    But what about the other goals you want to achieve? What about saving for retirement or investing for your future?

    If you commit to a large monthly mortgage payment, you may find yourself squeezed to make your remaining money cover your living expenses, plus monthly bills and loan repayments. While a lender can give you a mortgage you can reasonably afford, it could mean not being able to handle other financial priorities.

  3. 3. You’re the only one who can determine what’s comfortable

    Only you can examine your life and values to determine what you are willing to spend on your mortgage budget — and what you’re not.

    You might be perfectly happy to take on a larger monthly mortgage payment in exchange for reducing meals out, cutting back on vacations, or sticking with your old phone instead of going for the upgrades just because you can. Or you may decide that renting makes more sense for you because you can mitigate costs, take on less financial responsibility, and enjoy more flexibility.

    Either way, you need to determine what you feel comfortable with. You need to decide what works within both your budget and your long-term plans to reach goals that matter to you.

  4. 4. Ask yourself these questions to decide how much house you can really afford

    Once you set your financial priorities, here’s where you’ll need to do the math:

    • What’s my current income? What are my basic living expenses? What are my fixed costs?
    • How much do I want to put away each month into savings or investments?
    • How much will it cost to maintain my new home?
    • What kind of down payment do I have? (The more you put down, the smaller your monthly mortgage payment will be.)

    Now you can factor a mortgage into all of the above, and see how much you can really afford. When doing so, don’t forget to count both the mortgage principal and interest — along with property taxes, homeowners’ insurance, and other extras such as HOA fees.

Post courtesy of trulia.com

What You Need to Know About Buying a House This Summer

Planning on buying a house this season? Go in prepared with advice from the pros.

Summer brings longer days, warmer weather and more people out house-hunting — particularly families hoping to get settled before the school year begins in September. But there aren’t necessarily more houses on the market—and this year that’s truer than ever. “Inventory is the lowest I’ve ever seen it,” says Denver, CO, agent Susie Best. Recent Trulia research bears this out, showing inventory falling for 8 consecutive quarters. The reasons are varied: investors bought up homes during the crash and are renting them out now; prices have risen so much that homeowners can’t afford to trade up; or some homeowners are still underwater and can’t afford to sell yet. This means “multiple offers are driving up prices,” says Best. How to up your chances? Here’s what agents are advising buyers to do in this hot market — at the hottest time of year.

7 Tips for buying a home in the summer

  1. 1. Research trends based on your market location

    While many markets are red hot in the summer, that isn’t true across the board. For example, Chicago winters are long and many families seize the all-too-brief summers for vacation, so single-family home sales slow down a bit from June to September. “Right now we’re really a tale of two markets,” says Jennifer Ames, a Chicago, IL agent and a broker with Coldwell-Banker. “There’s a home surplus at the high end; the starter homes are where the competition is. I tell buyers, ‘Understand the dynamics of your particular market.’ They’re not all the same.” You can use Trulia Maps to check out historical pricing trends in the housing market where you’re looking.

  2. 2. Line up your financing

    This one applies year-round. And although interest rates will probably keep creeping up, “it’s still relatively cheap to borrow,” says Ashley Kendrick, an agent in Kansas City, MO. Even so, sellers are much more apt to consider buyers who present a loan preapproval letter up front. And make it from a known lender like a bank—not an application completed online.

  3. 3. Be clear with yourself on what matters most

    Make a list of your must-haves, your wants, and your it-would-be-nices so you’re ready to decide right away. “This is no time to be a lookie-loo,” Best says. “There’s no more, ‘Let me see if I qualify for this and come back.’” Know what you can live with and what you can’t live without.

  4. 4. Don’t quibble on price

    As the inventory for starter and trade-up homes continues to shrink, the competition for what’s available on the market is fierce. In markets where this is happening, “the price is never the price,” says Anthony Gibson, an agent from Austin, TX — buyers may need to offer more to stand out. “A healthy down payment always appeals,” Kendrick adds, since it suggests you’d have cash to cover any difference between appraised value and a higher asking price; you may be asked to sign a waiver agreeing to that. That’s not raising the overall price, Best notes—just how much you’d pay outside the loan.

    A bigger earnest-money payment (the good faith deposit you pay to a seller to show you’re serious) could also provide an edge, says Jennifer Ames. “A typical initial check might be $1,000; I might advise a buyer in competition to start with $5,000.”

  5. 5. Get your own real estate representation

    Particularly when timing is everything, a house-hunter needs the right agent. “Make sure yours can provide accurate information the minute a home hits market—for example, whether the seller is reviewing offers as they come in or after the weekend,” Best says. And do get your own agent to represent you: This is no time to try enticing a listing agent to handle both sides of the deal in an effort to curry favor with the sellers. With competing bids flying, you want someone fully focused and advocating on your behalf.

  6. 6. Craft a strong offer

    Top bid doesn’t always mean highest price. For sellers, flexible terms may be what clinches the deal—say, letting them pick the closing date, or a generous leaseback period that lets them stay put until they close on buying a home. Be sure not to load up your offer with unnecessary contingencies. “It’s important owners know they’re getting what they want,” Gibson says. And don’t forget the personal touch: “A letter to the seller always helps,” Kendrick suggests.

    Need some inspiration for that a letter to the seller? Here are three offer letter templates to get you started.

  7. 7. Don’t sweat it if it doesn’t happen by August

    Even when deals fizzle, the waiting and offering will probably pay off. “I tell my buyers, ‘You’ll find a house,’”  Kendrick says. “It’s a patience game.”

Post courtesy of Trulia,

10 Tips for Spring Home Buyers

Follow these 10 tips to make the home-buying process a happy one.

The arrival of spring means it’s time to start fresh. Along with pulling out your warm-weather wardrobe and tackling spring cleaning, you may have a bigger project on your to-do list: buying a new home.

Before you start on your home-shopping journey, check out these 10 home buying tips to save you both time and money.

Find the right agent

Real estate expert Joe Manausa says the key to happy spring home buying is finding the most qualified agent to guide you through the process.

With reviews available at your fingertips, finding a real estate agent you trust can be easy — provided you take the time to do some research.

Check for agents with the best reviews, and give them a call. They’ll relieve some of the pressures of home buying, and walk you through all the necessary steps.

Think location

Sure, the three things that matter most in real estate are “location, location, and location.” Nonetheless, some buyers end up purchasing a home in a location that’s not right for them, simply because they make their choice for all the wrong reasons.

“They’re looking at a house in the wrong area or the wrong school district, but they buy it because they like the kitchen,” Manausa says.

Use the new open house

The internet has completely changed the home-buying process, making it easier to choose which homes to go see in person.

With 3-D tours available on the web, buyers can tour a home from their mobile device or a computer. Eighty-seven percent of home buyers use online resources during their home search, according to the Zillow Group Report on Consumer Housing Trends.

Buy a home, not a project

Buyers who purchase a fixer-upper can end up spending the same (if not more) than they would on a new home.

“When buying a home, pay close attention to the ‘bones’ … and avoid getting caught up in the cosmetic features,” advises Dan Schaeffer, owner of Five Star Painting of Austin.

If the kitchen cabinets are in good shape, but you want the space to be brighter, adding a fresh coat of paint is easier and less expensive than replacing all the cabinets.

Ka-ching! Be a cash buyer

Sellers are more likely to choose the buyer who already has money in hand over an offer that’s contingent on a mortgage loan.

But if you can’t pay cash, getting pre-qualified for a loan can help the seller feel more confident that you’ll be able to secure financing.

Avoid disaster — get a warranty

The last thing you want after buying a home is for something to go wrong. You protect your car, so why not your home? Manausa recommends purchasing a home warranty: “[They’re] very affordable, and cover all the things that go wrong.” Your wallet will thank you.

Make inspection time count

Small problems eventually turn into big problems. The wood could rot, drains could leak, or the electrical panel may not be up to code. “Hire experts, and always get your home inspected,” adds Nathanael Toms, owner of Mr. Electric of Southwest Missouri.

If the inspection reveals issues, be sure to deal with them effectively. For example, “it’s very important that a licensed electrician makes sure all circuits work properly,” say Dana Philpot, owner of Mr. Electric of Central Kentucky.

Put safety first

No matter the neighborhood or the home, your family’s safety should always be the number one priority after purchasing a home.

“Even if the previous owner promised to return the copy of every key, it’s always a good idea to change the locks throughout the exterior of the home,” says J.B. Sassano, president of Mr. Handyman. “If the house has an alarm system, remember to change the code — and don’t forget the garage door.”

Fix common repairs

Repairs may come in the form of patching up small nail holes or weatherproofing electrical outlets. Whatever the need, Schaeffer recommends fixing the repairs before moving in your belongings. “An empty house is easier to maneuver and clean,” he says.

For bigger jobs, find a professional to complete the repairs. Sites such as Neighborly can help you find home services providers.

Add the finishing touches

The best part about buying a new house is making it a home. Change the color of the walls, update the lighting, or add a more personal touch with a photo gallery wall.

“It’s important to find the right gallery layout by measuring the wall space, which determines the size of photos you can use,” Sassano says. “Lightweight frames are the safest option, especially when hanging on drywall.”

Courtesy of zillow.com

How To Be Financally Prepared To Buy Your First Home

Getting ready to buy your first house can be daunting. Credit scores, down payments, and mortgages are all on your mind. Here’s a guide to help you get ready to make one of the biggest purchases of your life.

Buying your first home can be one of the most exhilarating — and stressful — moments of your life. But armed with the right information, you can shop for a house, apply for a mortgage, and close the deal with confidence.

Buying your first home: Where to start

The first thing to do before buying a home is to make sure it’s the right time to do so. Generally speaking, owning a home pays off financially if you will live in it for at least five years. Otherwise, there’s nothing wrong with renting. Your actual numbers may vary, but you can play with scenarios with our rent vs buy calculator.

Step 1: Determine how much house you can afford

You might disagree, but I don’t believe should treat your home as an investment. Yes, hopefully it will appreciate over time. But you should buy it because you want a home, not an investment.
That means you should never stretch to buy your primary residence thinking you can take cash out or flip it for a quick profit in a few years. Only buy a house that you can afford today!
Although it may not always be feasible if you live in an expensive real estate market, try to keep your total housing payment under 30 percent of your gross monthly income. When you spend much more than that on your mortgage, you risk becoming “house poor” — you might live in a beautiful home but find it difficult to save or even cover other monthly expenses.

Step 2: Prepare your finances for the mortgage process

The last thing you want to do is find your dream home only to discover you’re not financially qualified to buy it. To guarantee you’re financially ready to buy your first home, you’ll need good credit, cash to close, and a verifiable income.
Check your credit

Hopefully this isn’t a a surprise, but getting a mortgage requires a good credit score. It’s a good time to check your credit reports for errors and possibly invest in a few months of a daily credit score monitoring service.
A fast way to improve your score by a few points is to pay down credit card balances and stop using them for two months before you apply for a mortgage. Also, you’ll want to avoid applying for credit (for example, a new credit card or car loan) until after you’ve closed on your new home.
If you’re buying a home with a spouse or other co-buyer, your mortgage lender will likely consider both buyers’ credit scores in the application process. That’s not to say you’re necessarily doomed if one person’s credit isn’t as good, but don’t count on things going off without a hitch just because one buyer has a stellar score.
Finally, remember that improving your credit score significantly can take at least six months, so get started if you need to!
Save cash for a down payment and other expenses

In addition to making sure your credit score is in order, you’ll also want to consider the cash you’ll need to make buying your first home a reality. Of course there’s your down payment — typically between 3.5 and 20 percent of the purchase price.
As you save money for your down payment, avoid the temptation to invest in the volatile stock market with money you hope to use in the next year or two. While you might be tempted to try to earn a greater return on your money than an online saving account paying 1 percent, the greatest risk is not having your money available when you’re ready to buy a house.
And as you save, don’t underestimate how much money you’ll need — you might be surprised at how much cash you’ll need for closing over and above the down payment amount.
Get your documentation in order

Finally, if you’re close to putting an offer on a home, begin to collect documents that you’ll need to verify your financials on the mortgage application: paystubs, W-2’s, bank statements and, if you have freelance or self-employment income, copies of your last two tax returns.

Step 3: Go shopping for a mortgage

Too often, home buyers leave mortgage shopping to the last minute and watch their dream home go to another bidder who had financing in order. Mortgage pre-approval is a free and non-binding process that presents you to sellers as a serious, qualified buyer when buying your first home.
Mortgage types

Comparing two mortgages can be confusing. There are fixed-rates and adjustable rates, or ARMs, which are priced very differently. You can take out a mortgage for 30 years or as little as five years (interest rates are typically higher the longer the term of the loan).
Most buyers should look at fixed-rate mortgages and, indeed, the 30-year fixed rate mortgage is the most common kind of loan, by far. Still, it doesn’t hurt to become familiar with how mortgage rates work and the different kinds of loans that are available.
You may also want to run some scenarios through a mortgage calculator to see how different terms and rates will affect your monthly payment.
Mortgage fees

To make matters worse, mortgage lenders charge fees that aren’t necessarily reflected in the interest rate. There can be fees for appraising the home, checking your credit, and preparing documentation.
In some cases, you may be offered the option to pay “points” at closing that will reduce your interest rate. Points are essentially prepaid interest. This can be a tricky decision, but it can make sense if 1) you can afford to put down the extra cash and 2) expect to carry the mortgage for many, many years.
It can be a good habit to compare mortgage rates online regularly. You’ll notice that they fluctuate quite a bit from week-to-week and that some lenders will run the equivalent of “sales”, lowering rates to attract more customers away from the competition.
Private mortgage insurance (PMI)

If you put less than 20 percent down, your lender will likely charge you a monthly premium for what’s called private mortgage insurance, or PMI. Private mortgage insurance protects the bank in the event you default on your loan and the value of your home declines significantly.
Before the 2008 financial crisis, you probably remember hearing about how many people were starting to have trouble making payments on adjustable rate mortgages, or ARMs. This post briefly describes the difference between fixed rates and ARMs, as well as what mortgage points are, and whether you should ever pay them on your mortgage. Compare current mortgage rates and get good-faith estimates from a few lenders on what your rate and costs would be.

Where to get mortgage rates and pre-approval

The only wrong way to get a mortgage is to walk into your local bank, ask for a loan officer and accept whatever rate she gives you without ever shopping around.
You can compare rates with any number of leading online mortgage lenders or find a local mortgage broker who will shop your application to multiple lenders on your behalf.
I often also recommend using the site LendingTree to quickly get four or five competing mortgage rates from different banks. These rates will be more accurate than the ones you see in advertisements and Websites because banks provide real rates based upon your credit profile and the location and value of the home you want to buy. Learn more about getting mortgage quotes and pre-approval from LendingTree.

Post courtesy of MoneyUnder30.com

 

3 Ways to Research a Property Online

Once you’ve got the basics, it’s time to do a little more digging.

Nearly every home search starts online these days. Sorting through listings, photos, floor plans and descriptions is a great way to feel out the market for those who are in the earliest stages of the home search.

When you find a home you’re ready to bid on, it’s incredible how much background information you can find online. The Internet is full of data on past home sales, recorded sales prices, and the history of each sale, plus information that may not be as obvious — such as the safety of the neighborhood you’re considering buying into.

Here are three ways to use online tools and real estate mobile apps to get more details about the home you want.

Check building records

Nearly all public information and documentation is now available online, and most municipalities provide web access to building permit history. Although the law requires most sellers to disclose previous work done on the property, there may be a history of earlier work the seller didn’t know about.

For example, if there is a newer bathroom or kitchen but no history of a permit for the work, there is a chance someone did the work without a permit — and potentially not to health or safety code. And if you become the owner, this unpermitted work becomes your responsibility.

To begin your search, type “building records,” plus your city’s name into your favorite search engine. Example: “building records Seattle.”

Use Google Street View

Researching an address using Google’s Street View can be one of the most revealing options available. Street View provides a snapshot of a property at a particular moment in time, which can provide insight into the recent history of the property or neighborhood.

Be aware, however, that the image you see may not accurately reflect the home’s current state. For example, I helped a homeowner list and sell a home in San Francisco’s Lower Haight neighborhood a few years back. We planted a beautiful garden area to create a buffer between the sidewalk and the windows. But a search for the property on Google Street View revealed the windows with bars on them, and no garden. The previous owner had bars on the window, and someone had removed the bars to make the property look more inviting.

Seeing the windows with bars on them in Google Street View could raise questions for potential buyers: Is the neighborhood unsafe? Was there a history of crime in the community or on the property? Are the street-level windows safe?

Consult a neighborhood crime app

A variety of crime reporting apps for mobile devices show on a map recent crimes that have been reported, including assault, theft, robbery, homicide, vehicle theft, sex offenders, and quality of life (which often means noise complaints). It’s an easy way to get a quick overview of how safe or unsafe a neighborhood is.

So much information is available to buyers these days. You don’t need to rely solely on the seller’s or the real estate agent’s disclosures. Use online resources to find out as much background information on a property as you can, either before making an offer or during your contingency period. It is best to do as much research as possible, in order to make an informed final decision.

Post courtesy of zillow.com

Renters: Are You Ready to Buy a Home?

Photo credit: Milles Studio / shutterstock.com

While you save up your down payment, take these 5 steps to get you closer to closing.

For renters planning to buy a home, preliminary steps like creating a budget and saving for a down payment are obvious. Here are five more advanced steps toward moving out of your rental and into a dream home of your own.

Understand the full cost of homeownership

As a renter, a single rental fee covers your monthly housing payment. But as a homeowner, four main factors go into your monthly housing payment: principal, interest, taxes and insurance (P.I.T.I.). Understanding these costs will help you determine how much house you can afford.

Together, principal and interest comprise your monthly mortgage payment, with the principal paying down your loan balance each month, and the interest paying your fee for borrowing the money. Use a mortgage calculator to determine how much of your payment goes toward principal versus interest each month.

Taxes refer to property taxes, which are assessed by the county you live in. They average 1.2 percent of your home’s value each year.

Insurance — paid to a homeowner’s insurance company of your choice — is required when you have a mortgage. Lenders require that your insurance cover the cost of rebuilding the home if it is ruined by fire or other disaster. This “replacement cost” is determined by your insurer, and must be agreed to by your lender. Insurance will typically cost $700 to $1,200 per year for a single family home.

For condo owners, there’s a fifth monthly cost category: homeowners association (HOA) dues. These fees cover common area amenities, landscaping, ongoing upkeep and reserves for future maintenance like roof replacement or exterior painting. These monthly dues range from $100 for cheaper condos to $1,000 or more for luxury condos.

Single family home buyers can take a useful cue from HOA budgets, which generally require that at least 10 percent of dues go toward reserves. Even if you’re not buying a condo, it’s a good idea to set up a similar savings plan for future maintenance like replacing a roof or major appliances.

Know your homeowner tax benefits

Mortgage interest and property taxes are deductible when you file your annual tax returns, and reduce taxable income.

These deductions significantly lower your cost of homeownership. For example, for a $300,000 home with 20 percent down and a 30-year fixed mortgage at 4 percent, monthly P.I.T.I. is about $1,545. Tax deductions reduce this total housing cost to about $1,215.

Study rent-vs.-buy math

Often, people judge the cost of renting vs. buying by comparing P.I.T.I. to a rental payment. But to get an apples-to-apples comparison, you actually have to look at after-tax-benefit homeownership costs and rent costs.

Using the example above of a $300,000 home that costs $1,215 per month after taxes, you could compare this residence to a home that rents for about $1,200. If the $300,000 home was more spacious or in a more desirable area, the math would seem to favor buying — but don’t forget this example requires a $60,000 down payment.

Identify mortgages that fit your budget and timeline

If you don’t have 20 percent to put down, you can still get a mortgage with as little as 3 percent down. However, if your down payment is less than 20 percent, you’ll have to pay mortgage insurance, which is about .85 percent of your loan amount, and isn’t tax deductible.

Your monthly P.I.T.I. (which includes mortgage insurance) is about $1,995 on a $300,000 home with 3 percent down and a 30-year fixed mortgage at 4 percent. After tax deductions, this total housing cost drops to about $1,614. And you’d only need $9,000 for the down payment.

You can also lower your rate and P.I.T.I. with a shorter-term loan like a 5-year ARM, but rates on these loans will adjust in 5 years, so you risk having a much higher payment if you plan to stay in the home longer than that.

Start preparing your credit score now

Credit scores are critical for getting the best mortgages with the lowest rates. Lenders want reliable on-time payment history as well as credit depth.

More credit accounts are better, so renters with only one credit card should consider obtaining more credit. Just note that your credit score can drop 5 to 15 points when you first open a new account, then will come back up when you’ve established a good payment history.

Post courtesy of zillow.com.