Some Helpful Tips For Investing In Real Estate Using Retirement Funds

Most people mistakenly believe that their retirement accounts must be invested in traditional financial related investments such as stocks, mutual funds, exchange traded funds, etc. Few Investors realize that the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) permits retirement accounts, such as an IRA or 401(k) plan, to invest in real estate and other alternative types of investments.  In fact, IRS rules permit one to invest retirement funds in almost any type of investment, aside generally from any investment involving a disqualified person, collectibles and life insurance.

One of the primary advantages of purchasing real estate with retirement funds is that all gains are tax-deferred until a distribution is made or tax-free in the case of a Roth account (after-tax). For example, if one purchased a piece of property with retirement funds for $100,000 and later sold the property for $300,000, the $200,000 of gain appreciation would generally be tax-deferred. Whereas, if you purchased the property using personal funds (non-retirement funds), the gain would be subject to federal income tax and in most cases state income tax.

The two most common vehicles for purchasing real estate with retirement funds is the self-directed IRA or an employer sponsored 401(k) plan.  However, most employer 401(k) plans do not offer real estate as a plan investment option and, thus, the self-directed IRA has become the most popular way to buy real estate with retirement funds.  Establishing a self-directed IRA is quick and relatively inexpensive and can be done in just a few days.  The most challenging aspect of investing in real estate using retirement funds is navigating the IRS prohibited transaction rules.  In general, pursuant to Internal Revenue Code (“IRC”) Section 4975, the retirement account holder cannot make a retirement account investment that will directly or indirectly benefit ones self or any disqualified person (lineal descendant of the retirement account holder and related entities), perform any service in connection with the retirement account investment, guarantee any retirement account loan, extend any credit to or from the retirement account, or enter into any transaction with the retirement account that would present a conflict of interest.  The purpose of these rules is to encourage the use of retirement account for accumulation of retirement savings and to prohibit those in control of the retirement account from taking advantage of the tax benefits for their personal account.

Aside from navigating the IRS prohibited transaction rules, the following are a handful of helpful tips for making real estate investment using retirement funds:

  • The deposit and purchase price for the real estate property should be paid using retirement account funds and not from any disqualified person(s)
  • All expenses, repairs and taxes incurred in connection with the retirement account real estate investment should be paid using retirement funds – no personal funds from any disqualified person should be used
  • If additional funds are required for improvements or other matters involving the retirement account-owned real estate investment, all funds should come from the retirement account or from a non-“disqualified person”
  • Partnering with yourself or another disqualified person in connection with a retirement account investment could trigger the IRS prohibited transaction rules.
  • If financing is needed for a real estate transaction, only nonrecourse financing should be used. A nonrecourse loan is a loan that is not personally guaranteed by the retirement account holder or any disqualified person and whereby the lender’s only recourse is against the property and not against the borrower.
  • If using a nonrecourse loan to purchase real estate with a self-directed IRA, the unrelated business taxable income (“UBTI”) rules could be triggered and a tax rate reaching as high as 40 percent could apply.  Note – an exemption from this tax is available for 401(k) plans pursuant to IRC 514(c)(9). If the UBTI tax is triggered and tax is due, IRS Form 990-T must be timely filed.
  • No services should be performed by the retirement account holder or any “disqualified person” in connection with the real estate investment.  Please see: Finally Some Clarity On What You Can And Cannot Do In Your Self-Directed IRA for additional information
  • Title of the real estate purchased should be in the name of the retirement account. For example, if Joe Smith established a Self-Directed IRA LLC and named the LLC “XYZ, LLC”, title to the real estate purchased by Joe’s Self-Directed IRA LLC would be as follows: XYZ LLC.  Whereas, if Joe Smith established a self-directed IRA with ABC IRA Trust Company (custodian), and the custodian purchased the real estate directly on behalf of Joe without the use of an LLC, then title would read:  ABC IRA Trust Company FBO John Doe IRA.
  • Keep good records of income and expenses generated by the retirement account owned real estate investment
  • All income, gains or losses from the retirement account real estate investment should be allocated to the retirement account owner of the investment
  • Make sure you perform adequate diligence on the property you will be purchasing especially if it is in a state you do not live in.
  • Beware of fraud if purchasing real estate from a promoter.
  • If using a self-directed IRA LLC to buy real estate, it is good practice to form the LLC in the state where the real estate will be located to avoid any additional filing fees.  Also, be mindful of any annual state LLC filing or franchise fees.

Using retirement funds to buy real estate can offer retirement account holders a number of positive financial and tax benefits, such as a way to invest in what one knows and understands, investment diversification, inflation protection, and the ability to generate tax-deferred or tax-free (in the case of a Roth) income or gains. The list of helpful tips outlined above should provide retirement account investors looking to buy real estate with a guideline of how to keep their retirement account from running afoul of any of the IRS rules.  However, retirement account holders using retirement funds to invest in real estate must be mindful of the broad application of the IRS prohibited transaction and UBTI rules and should consult with a tax professional for further guidance.

Post courtesy of Forbes.

How Much House Can You Really Afford?

Just because a lender approves you for a mortgage doesn’t mean you can comfortably afford it.

If you ask Google “how much house can I afford,” you’ll find a number of online tools and mortgage calculators to help you find a fast answer. You might also find quick but somewhat confusing advice like “your mortgage payment shouldn’t take up more than 35% of your monthly income.”

Quick. Do you know what 35% of your monthly income is? If not, you’re not alone. While online housing tools are a helpful starting point for the early stages of your house hunt, it’s important that you understand how the pieces all fit together, and that you take your personal financial situation into account.

Why a calculator can’t tell you how much house you can afford

  1. 1. Financial rules of thumb may not apply to you

    While 35% seems like a straightforward figure, your financial picture is a lot more complicated than that number would make things seem. Your ideal monthly housing costs could vary depending on things such as debt and other monthly payment obligations — not to mention how much you’ve saved for a down payment.

    If you have high credit scores and a clean financial background, a mortgage calculator can be a great starting point for mortgage shopping. You’ll get a much better sense of what your price range might be instead of a blanket rule of thumb. But they’re only as accurate as the information you provide, so if you forget to add regular budget line items such as food, day care, or gas costs, you won’t get a complete picture.

  2. 2. Your lender may approve you for more than you can realistically afford

    Lenders are now legally required to ensure borrowers can “reasonably afford” to repay a loan before they approve a new mortgage. But there’s a difference between being able to reasonably afford something and being able to realistically afford something.

    When looking at what’s reasonable, lenders account for your income and any current debts that you need to repay each month. If you make $5,000 per month after taxes and need to pay $500 toward your car loan each month, a mortgage payment of $1,500 may seem perfectly reasonable.

    In this (extremely simplified) example, you’d have about $3,000 per month left over to handle all your other expenses. And perhaps you can afford your living expenses on this budget.

    But what about the other goals you want to achieve? What about saving for retirement or investing for your future?

    If you commit to a large monthly mortgage payment, you may find yourself squeezed to make your remaining money cover your living expenses, plus monthly bills and loan repayments. While a lender can give you a mortgage you can reasonably afford, it could mean not being able to handle other financial priorities.

  3. 3. You’re the only one who can determine what’s comfortable

    Only you can examine your life and values to determine what you are willing to spend on your mortgage budget — and what you’re not.

    You might be perfectly happy to take on a larger monthly mortgage payment in exchange for reducing meals out, cutting back on vacations, or sticking with your old phone instead of going for the upgrades just because you can. Or you may decide that renting makes more sense for you because you can mitigate costs, take on less financial responsibility, and enjoy more flexibility.

    Either way, you need to determine what you feel comfortable with. You need to decide what works within both your budget and your long-term plans to reach goals that matter to you.

  4. 4. Ask yourself these questions to decide how much house you can really afford

    Once you set your financial priorities, here’s where you’ll need to do the math:

    • What’s my current income? What are my basic living expenses? What are my fixed costs?
    • How much do I want to put away each month into savings or investments?
    • How much will it cost to maintain my new home?
    • What kind of down payment do I have? (The more you put down, the smaller your monthly mortgage payment will be.)

    Now you can factor a mortgage into all of the above, and see how much you can really afford. When doing so, don’t forget to count both the mortgage principal and interest — along with property taxes, homeowners’ insurance, and other extras such as HOA fees.

Post courtesy of trulia.com

Pro Tips for Making the Most of Your Kitchen Remodeling Budget

Two experts weigh in on how to put your money where it counts.

A high-end kitchen remodel could easily drain your wallet. The nationwide average for a major kitchen remodel — replacing all appliances, installing a sink and faucet, and repainting walls — is $62,158, according to Remodeling magazine. And in cities like New York, those costs edge even higher.

A modest kitchen remodel, in which the cabinets are left in place, is $20,830 on average, and that’s not even accounting for labor delays or electrical issues from outdated wiring, which is common in kitchens.

Fortunately, there are ways to keep costs down without going batty. Here, two renowned interior designers share their tips for renovating a kitchen.

Consider how long you’ll be in the home

“Do you plan to be there two to three years, which means reselling is very important? Or do you plan to be there five to 10 years?” says Elena Frampton, creative director at Frampton Co in Manhattan. “That makes a difference in terms of design direction.”

If reselling is a factor, focus on basic, clean cabinetry and new appliances. If you’re staying longer, it’s about personalizing the space.

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Evaluate the layout

“Ask yourself if you want your kitchen to be open or closed,” Frampton says. The answer will determine not only the kitchen’s layout, but also how it interacts with adjacent spaces.

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Factor in pantry space

Homeowners forget this frequently used storage space all too often. Frampton recommends including it in your plans.

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Choose cabinets wisely

When remodeling a kitchen, you really need to understand how you live, how you cook, and how you like to organize things. “Know what you prefer and not necessarily what the marketplace is offering as a standard,” Frampton says. After all, the kitchen has to be functional.

If you’re annoyed by setting the toaster on top of the microwave every time you finish using it, you may want an appliance garage to keep gadgets and gizmos more accessible. “Focus on how it works for you,” Frampton adds.

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Forget name-brand appliances

Concentrate instead on getting the right dimensions for the space, and appliances that fit how you live. “Looking at those practical elements is really important if you’re on a budget,” Frampton adds.

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Buy a counter-depth refrigerator

“A space-saving unit that barely protrudes past the edge of your countertop is a worthwhile investment,” says Michael Tower, architect and partner at Studio Tractor in Brooklyn. “I hate fridges that are so deep that they take up a lot of your footprint. You’re always bumping into them.”

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Select the right countertop material

“Countertop trends change year to year, so understand your tolerance for each material’s character,” Frampton advises. “Do you want something that’s aesthetically quiet, something dark, something light with grout lines, or something without grout? Can you live with the patina of natural stone? Or do you need some sort of man-made conglomerate material?”

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Avoid cheap hardware

“You want your cabinets to last a long time,” says Tower. “You open and close them how many thousand times a week?” Splurge on durable materials that look good and will last.

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Save on lighting

While quality lighting is important from a functional perspective, Tower says, “From an investment point of view, it’s not a big deal any longer.”

Most standard cabinets feature some kind of LED underlighting. And when it comes to decorative fixtures, there are plenty of options to choose from at flea markets or resale design sites like Chairish. Just be sure to measure your finds before swiping your credit card.

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Post courtesy of Zillow.com

What You Need to Know About Buying a House This Summer

Planning on buying a house this season? Go in prepared with advice from the pros.

Summer brings longer days, warmer weather and more people out house-hunting — particularly families hoping to get settled before the school year begins in September. But there aren’t necessarily more houses on the market—and this year that’s truer than ever. “Inventory is the lowest I’ve ever seen it,” says Denver, CO, agent Susie Best. Recent Trulia research bears this out, showing inventory falling for 8 consecutive quarters. The reasons are varied: investors bought up homes during the crash and are renting them out now; prices have risen so much that homeowners can’t afford to trade up; or some homeowners are still underwater and can’t afford to sell yet. This means “multiple offers are driving up prices,” says Best. How to up your chances? Here’s what agents are advising buyers to do in this hot market — at the hottest time of year.

7 Tips for buying a home in the summer

  1. 1. Research trends based on your market location

    While many markets are red hot in the summer, that isn’t true across the board. For example, Chicago winters are long and many families seize the all-too-brief summers for vacation, so single-family home sales slow down a bit from June to September. “Right now we’re really a tale of two markets,” says Jennifer Ames, a Chicago, IL agent and a broker with Coldwell-Banker. “There’s a home surplus at the high end; the starter homes are where the competition is. I tell buyers, ‘Understand the dynamics of your particular market.’ They’re not all the same.” You can use Trulia Maps to check out historical pricing trends in the housing market where you’re looking.

  2. 2. Line up your financing

    This one applies year-round. And although interest rates will probably keep creeping up, “it’s still relatively cheap to borrow,” says Ashley Kendrick, an agent in Kansas City, MO. Even so, sellers are much more apt to consider buyers who present a loan preapproval letter up front. And make it from a known lender like a bank—not an application completed online.

  3. 3. Be clear with yourself on what matters most

    Make a list of your must-haves, your wants, and your it-would-be-nices so you’re ready to decide right away. “This is no time to be a lookie-loo,” Best says. “There’s no more, ‘Let me see if I qualify for this and come back.’” Know what you can live with and what you can’t live without.

  4. 4. Don’t quibble on price

    As the inventory for starter and trade-up homes continues to shrink, the competition for what’s available on the market is fierce. In markets where this is happening, “the price is never the price,” says Anthony Gibson, an agent from Austin, TX — buyers may need to offer more to stand out. “A healthy down payment always appeals,” Kendrick adds, since it suggests you’d have cash to cover any difference between appraised value and a higher asking price; you may be asked to sign a waiver agreeing to that. That’s not raising the overall price, Best notes—just how much you’d pay outside the loan.

    A bigger earnest-money payment (the good faith deposit you pay to a seller to show you’re serious) could also provide an edge, says Jennifer Ames. “A typical initial check might be $1,000; I might advise a buyer in competition to start with $5,000.”

  5. 5. Get your own real estate representation

    Particularly when timing is everything, a house-hunter needs the right agent. “Make sure yours can provide accurate information the minute a home hits market—for example, whether the seller is reviewing offers as they come in or after the weekend,” Best says. And do get your own agent to represent you: This is no time to try enticing a listing agent to handle both sides of the deal in an effort to curry favor with the sellers. With competing bids flying, you want someone fully focused and advocating on your behalf.

  6. 6. Craft a strong offer

    Top bid doesn’t always mean highest price. For sellers, flexible terms may be what clinches the deal—say, letting them pick the closing date, or a generous leaseback period that lets them stay put until they close on buying a home. Be sure not to load up your offer with unnecessary contingencies. “It’s important owners know they’re getting what they want,” Gibson says. And don’t forget the personal touch: “A letter to the seller always helps,” Kendrick suggests.

    Need some inspiration for that a letter to the seller? Here are three offer letter templates to get you started.

  7. 7. Don’t sweat it if it doesn’t happen by August

    Even when deals fizzle, the waiting and offering will probably pay off. “I tell my buyers, ‘You’ll find a house,’”  Kendrick says. “It’s a patience game.”

Post courtesy of Trulia,

10 Tips for Spring Home Buyers

Follow these 10 tips to make the home-buying process a happy one.

The arrival of spring means it’s time to start fresh. Along with pulling out your warm-weather wardrobe and tackling spring cleaning, you may have a bigger project on your to-do list: buying a new home.

Before you start on your home-shopping journey, check out these 10 home buying tips to save you both time and money.

Find the right agent

Real estate expert Joe Manausa says the key to happy spring home buying is finding the most qualified agent to guide you through the process.

With reviews available at your fingertips, finding a real estate agent you trust can be easy — provided you take the time to do some research.

Check for agents with the best reviews, and give them a call. They’ll relieve some of the pressures of home buying, and walk you through all the necessary steps.

Think location

Sure, the three things that matter most in real estate are “location, location, and location.” Nonetheless, some buyers end up purchasing a home in a location that’s not right for them, simply because they make their choice for all the wrong reasons.

“They’re looking at a house in the wrong area or the wrong school district, but they buy it because they like the kitchen,” Manausa says.

Use the new open house

The internet has completely changed the home-buying process, making it easier to choose which homes to go see in person.

With 3-D tours available on the web, buyers can tour a home from their mobile device or a computer. Eighty-seven percent of home buyers use online resources during their home search, according to the Zillow Group Report on Consumer Housing Trends.

Buy a home, not a project

Buyers who purchase a fixer-upper can end up spending the same (if not more) than they would on a new home.

“When buying a home, pay close attention to the ‘bones’ … and avoid getting caught up in the cosmetic features,” advises Dan Schaeffer, owner of Five Star Painting of Austin.

If the kitchen cabinets are in good shape, but you want the space to be brighter, adding a fresh coat of paint is easier and less expensive than replacing all the cabinets.

Ka-ching! Be a cash buyer

Sellers are more likely to choose the buyer who already has money in hand over an offer that’s contingent on a mortgage loan.

But if you can’t pay cash, getting pre-qualified for a loan can help the seller feel more confident that you’ll be able to secure financing.

Avoid disaster — get a warranty

The last thing you want after buying a home is for something to go wrong. You protect your car, so why not your home? Manausa recommends purchasing a home warranty: “[They’re] very affordable, and cover all the things that go wrong.” Your wallet will thank you.

Make inspection time count

Small problems eventually turn into big problems. The wood could rot, drains could leak, or the electrical panel may not be up to code. “Hire experts, and always get your home inspected,” adds Nathanael Toms, owner of Mr. Electric of Southwest Missouri.

If the inspection reveals issues, be sure to deal with them effectively. For example, “it’s very important that a licensed electrician makes sure all circuits work properly,” say Dana Philpot, owner of Mr. Electric of Central Kentucky.

Put safety first

No matter the neighborhood or the home, your family’s safety should always be the number one priority after purchasing a home.

“Even if the previous owner promised to return the copy of every key, it’s always a good idea to change the locks throughout the exterior of the home,” says J.B. Sassano, president of Mr. Handyman. “If the house has an alarm system, remember to change the code — and don’t forget the garage door.”

Fix common repairs

Repairs may come in the form of patching up small nail holes or weatherproofing electrical outlets. Whatever the need, Schaeffer recommends fixing the repairs before moving in your belongings. “An empty house is easier to maneuver and clean,” he says.

For bigger jobs, find a professional to complete the repairs. Sites such as Neighborly can help you find home services providers.

Add the finishing touches

The best part about buying a new house is making it a home. Change the color of the walls, update the lighting, or add a more personal touch with a photo gallery wall.

“It’s important to find the right gallery layout by measuring the wall space, which determines the size of photos you can use,” Sassano says. “Lightweight frames are the safest option, especially when hanging on drywall.”

Courtesy of zillow.com

6 Apartment Upgrades That Landlords Hate

When you move into a place, it’s normal to want to make it your own, by hanging pictures or even painting an accent wall cherry red. But when you’re renting, you’d best remember: Any changes you make may be reversed by your landlord once you move out and with your money. That’s why renters have to walk a fine line between making themselves feel at home and making changes that will cost them their security deposit.

“If you decide to paint the walls while you are there, you must return them to their original color or the landlord is within their rights to use the deposit to pay for it themselves,” says Trent Zachmann of Renters Warehouse. He explains that many landlords treat modifications or improvements and accidental damages the same when it comes to taking money from your security deposit. “An owner can withhold all or part of the deposit to correct either type of issue,” he says.

But all is not lost: Sometimes modifications can be made with the owner’s approval. Just make sure you’re 100% clear about the stipulations of your lease before you pick up a paintbrush or hammer. Straight from the mouths of landlords, here’s a list of upgrades tenants have attempted that they hate—and will use your security deposit to fix.

1. Painting

This is the No. 1 alteration that landlords complain about.

Annmarie Bhola, a landlord in New York City, understands that, for first-time renters especially, there’s an excitement with moving into a new home. And, to many, that means breaking out the paint.

“To feel at home, a fresh coat of personality-defining color is the icing on the cake,” she says. “That’s all cool, but know that if you paint the walls hot pink, it will be coming out of the security deposit! That was one of the most memorable colors I’ve had to repaint.”

Atlanta landlord Bruce Ailion describes creative painting projects as his biggest headache.

“You would think a tenant would pick a neutral color and have a professional paint,” he laments. “Instead they paint purple or black, get paint on the ceiling, on the trim, on the door knobs and outlets. Some will paint around the bed and pictures. It’s a mess.”

2. Hanging pictures

After repainting, filling in holes in drywall is one of the most common issues landlords have to deal with after a tenant moves out.

“Everyone likes to put up pictures, and fortunately new technologies have brought about alternative, less destructive hanging methods, which is great,” says Bhola. So then why don’t more people think to use Command strips instead of nails? “Nine out of 10 times, I always have to fill in the holes and bust out the spare bucket of paint.”

3. Installing window treatments

We know: Those white plastic vertical blinds are so ugly. Your impulse to put up a curtain rod or Roman shades is completely normal. But the holes you have to drill into the wall to mount the window treatments, like those for your pictures, will require patching once you move out. Landlords fume every time they see big screw marks around the window frame.

“Repairing the holes ends up being expensive and time-consuming,” says Zachmann. If you must hang curtains, use large Command hooks that adhere to the wall and don’t leave any stickiness behind.

4. Mounting a TV

What’s worse than hammering nails into the drywall to hang pictures or curtains? Drilling holes in the wall to mount your flat-screen TV.

“The screws have to go directly into the center of studs,” says Brian Davis, director of education at real estate service company SparkRental. “At best, the renter will have screwed 10 to 20 holes into the wall. At worst, the TV will crash to the floor [because it wasn’t mounted correctly], possibly injure someone, shatter the TV, and take a chunk of the wall down with it.” He recommends that renters use a TV stand.

5. Gardening

You would think that planting a few tulips would delight a landlord. But that’s not necessarily the case.

“As a landlord, I want the most maintenance-free rental as possible,” says Atlanta-area property owner and real estate writer Laura Agadoni. “In some cases, I pay for a landscaping service, but I would not want to keep up a garden.”

So, don’t make any changes to the landscaping without the landlord’s written permission. And if you do, don’t be surprised if your security deposit is used to  return the yard to its previous state.

6. Updating appliances

If you’re not a fan of that noisy old refrigerator in your rental, it’s perfectly fine to swap it out with a new one of your own so long as you talk it over with your landlord first, and then reconnect the old one after you move out.

“What’s never acceptable is swapping out an appliance, throwing the old one away, and then taking the new one with you when you move out, leaving a gaping hole where there was once an appliance,” says Davis.

So if there’s something you’d like to update, just ask your landlord about it first. You never know.

“What some landlords will allow may be different than what other landlords allow,” says New York City broker Eric D. Rosen. “In some cases, it might even be possible that a landlord will share the cost.”

7 High-Impact Home Improvement Projects You Can Do for $10K or Less

You don’t have to spend a lot to make these valuable home improvements.

With so much emphasis on buying and selling homes — the truth is that for most of your life as a real estate consumer, you’ll be a homeowner. And because your home is so much more than a transaction, spending some portion of your time, energy, and money improving your home makes sense.

Many homeowners waituntil saving up tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars in equity to make a major change to their home. And that means they almost never do the project, or do it only when it’s time to sell. If you’re planning to stay put in your home for a while, home improvement projects will drive even more return on your home investment.

7 home improvement projects for $10,000 or less

  1. Crank up the curb appeal

    Enhancing curb appeal is one of the most cost-effective home improvement projects. There’s just something about loving the way your home looks when you drive up to it day after day that dramatically increases your enjoyment of home.

    Depending on which projects you choose and whether you do the work yourself, you can crank up your curb appeal for a few hundred dollars or a few thousand. Some curb appeal ideas to consider include painting or power wash your home’s exterior, painting or installing a new garage door, front door or exterior trim work, exterior or landscape lighting, or a simple front yard landscaping spruce-up.

  2. Get rid of a wall

    The number one remodel fantasy of homeowners-to-be: knocking down a wall.

    In fact, removing walls, even structural walls, is highly feasible and much less expensive than many homeowners assume. (If a load-bearing wall is removed, the structural component can often be preserved and finished by simply leaving a beam at the ceiling.) What can jack up the price is the relocation of plumbing or wiring contained in the wall being removed.

    Reconnecting interruptions in flooring and adding features like an island also increase expenses. Check with a reputable contractor to find out how such a project can be planned and executed efficiently.

  3. Swap out old windows for new, dual-paned windows

    Replacing old, single-paned windows for new dual-paned windows might make your home look better, but it will definitely make your home operate more efficiently — and more comfortably. They’re also a must if you have street noise or other noise challenges around your home; the extra insulation traps noise before it can get to you.

    As with everything, costs vary by location and by the quality of window you choose, but you can use $200 to $300 per window, installed, as a rough rule of thumb.

  4. Build an outdoor kitchen

    The National Outdoor Kitchen and Fireplace Association pegs the average cost of an outdoor kitchen at $12,000 to $15,000 on average — but if you can cut costs, find appliances on sale, or do some of the work yourself, you might just be able to get one in your own backyard for the $10,000 price point. Outdoor kitchens can be as simple as a table and grill, or as complex as wood-burning ovens, refrigerators, and big-screen TVs.

  5. Buy new kitchen appliances

    In terms of sheer functionality, new kitchen appliances can create an upgrade to your family’s everyday life. A new fridge will run you anywhere from $350 to $2,000 on average, a new stove/oven range can run anywhere from $300 to $6,000, and a dishwasher will cost you somewhere around $250 to $1,600.

  6. Swap out your carpet

    If you have $10K to spend and you can’t stand your carpet, you can estimate that it’ll run you about $300 to $500 per room to replace it with new carpet, or $1,500 to $2,000 per room to replace it with hardwood, depending on where you live, how large your rooms are, and what specific materials you choose.

  7. Build in organizing systems

    One of the most significant advantages to owning your home is that you can customize it to manage your stuff and your activities, rather than being forced to fit your things into someone else’s system. If you have $10K in hand to make your home more “you,” consider having custom organizing systems built into your closet, office, pantry, or garage, tailored to your family’s stuff and needs.

Courtesy of trulia.com.